Abney Associates Ameriprise Financial Advisor: How to choose a beneficiary for your IRA or 401(k)?

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Selecting beneficiaries for retirement benefits is different from choosing beneficiaries for other assets such as life insurance. With retirement benefits, you need to know the impact of income tax and estate tax laws in order to select the right beneficiaries. Although taxes shouldn’t be the sole determining factor in naming your beneficiaries, ignoring the impact of taxes could lead you to make an incorrect choice.


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Abney Associates Ameriprise Financial Advisor: Deciding what to do with your 401(k) plan when you change jobs

When you change jobs, you need to decide what to do with the money in your 401(k) plan. Should you leave it where it is, or take it with you? Should you roll the money over into an IRA or into your new employer’s retirement plan?

Article Reference: http://www.ameripriseadvisors.com/team/abney-associates/articles/65/deciding-what-to-do-with-your-401k-plan-when-you-change-jobs/

Answered 3 months ago
3 months ago Leonard Lian said:
 

TRANSFER THE FUNDS DIRECTLY TO YOUR NEW EMPLOYER’S RETIREMENT PLAN OR TO AN IRA (A DIRECT ROLLOVER)

Just as you can always withdraw the funds from your 401(k) when you leave your job, you can always roll over your 401(k) funds to your new employer’s retirement plan if the new plan allows it. You can also roll over your funds to a traditional IRA. You can either transfer the funds to a traditional IRA that you already have, or open a new IRA to receive the funds. There’s no dollar limit on how much 401(k) money you can transfer to an IRA.

You can also roll over (“convert”) your non-Roth 401(k) money to a Roth IRA. The taxable portion of your distribution from the 401(k) plan will be included in your income at the time of the rollover.

If you’ve made Roth contributions to your 401(k) plan you can only roll those funds over into another Roth 401(k) plan or Roth 403(b) plan (if your new employer’s plan accepts rollovers) or to a Roth IRA.

Generally, the best way to roll over funds is to have your 401(k) plan directly transfer your funds to your new employer’s retirement plan or to an IRA you’ve established. A direct rollover is simply a transfer of assets from the trustee or custodian of one retirement savings plan to the trustee or custodian of another (a “trustee-to-trustee transfer”). It’s a seamless process that allows your retirement savings to remain tax deferred without interruption. Once you fill out the necessary paperwork, your 401(k) funds move directly to your new employer’s retirement plan or to your IRA; the money never passes through your hands. And, if you directly roll over your 401(k) funds following federal rollover rules, no federal income tax will be withheld.

Note: In some cases, your old plan may mail you a check made payable to the trustee or custodian of your employer-sponsored retirement plan or IRA. If that happens, don’t be concerned. This is still considered to be a direct rollover. Bring or mail the check to the institution acting as trustee or custodian of your retirement plan or IRA.

3 months ago Yeena Indo said:
 

TAKE THE MONEY AND RUN

When you leave your current employer, you can withdraw your 401(k) funds in a lump sum. To do this, simply instruct your 401(k) plan administrator to cut you a check. Then you’re free to do whatever you please with those funds. You can use them to meet expenses (e.g., medical bills, college tuition), put them toward a large purchase (e.g., a home or car), or invest them elsewhere.

While cashing out is certainly tempting, it’s almost never a good idea. Taking a lump sum distribution from your 401(k) can significantly reduce your retirement savings, and is generally not advisable unless you urgently need money and have no other alternatives. Not only will you miss out on the continued tax-deferral of your 401(k) funds, but you’ll also face an immediate tax bite.

First, you’ll have to pay federal (and possibly state) income tax on the money you withdraw (except for the amount of any after-tax contributions you’ve made). If the amount is large enough, you could even be pushed into a higher tax bracket for the year. If you’re under age 59½, you’ll generally have to pay a 10 percent premature distribution penalty tax in addition to regular income tax, unless you qualify for an exception. (For instance, you’re generally exempt from this penalty if you’re 55 or older when you leave your job.) And, because your employer is also required to withhold 20 percent of your distribution for federal taxes, the amount of cash you get may be significantly less than you expect.

Note: Because lump-sum distributions from 401(k) plans involve complex tax issues, especially for individuals born before 1936, consult a tax professional for more information.

Note: If your 401(k) plan allows Roth contributions, qualified distributions of your Roth contributions and earnings will be free from federal income tax. If you receive a nonqualified distribution from a Roth 401(k) account only the earnings (not your original Roth contributions) will be subject to income tax and potential early distribution penalties.

3 months ago Younhee Lee said:
 

LEAVE THE FUNDS WHERE THEY ARE

One option when you change jobs is simply to leave the funds in your old employer’s 401(k) plan where they will continue to grow tax deferred.

However, you may not always have this opportunity. If your vested 401(k) balance is $5,000 or less, your employer can require you to take your money out of the plan when you leave the company. (Your vested 401(k) balance consists of anything you’ve contributed to the plan, as well as any employer contributions you have the right to receive.)

Leaving your money in your old employer’s 401(k) plan may be a good idea if you’re happy with the investment alternatives offered or you need time to explore other options. You may also want to leave the funds where they are temporarily if your new employer offers a 401(k) plan but requires new employees to work for the company for a certain length of time before allowing them to participate. When the waiting period is up, you can have the plan administrator of your old employer’s 401(k) transfer your funds to your new employer’s 401(k) (assuming the new plan accepts rollover contributions).


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LEAVE THE FUNDS WHERE THEY ARE

One option when you change jobs is simply to leave the funds in your old employer’s 401(k) plan where they will continue to grow tax deferred.

However, you may not always have this opportunity. If your vested 401(k) balance is $5,000 or less, your employer can require you to take your money out of the plan when you leave the company. (Your vested 401(k) balance consists of anything you’ve contributed to the plan, as well as any employer contributions you have the right to receive.)

Leaving your money in your old employer’s 401(k) plan may be a good idea if you’re happy with the investment alternatives offered or you need time to explore other options. You may also want to leave the funds where they are temporarily if your new employer offers a 401(k) plan but requires new employees to work for the company for a certain length of time before allowing them to participate. When the waiting period is up, you can have the plan administrator of your old employer’s 401(k) transfer your funds to your new employer’s 401(k) (assuming the new plan accepts rollover contributions).

Answered 3 months ago

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Abney Associates Ameriprise Financial Advisor: Life insurance at various life stages

Your need for life insurance changes as your life changes. When you’re young, you typically have less need for life insurance, but that changes as you take on more responsibility and your family grows. Then, as your responsibilities once again begin to diminish, your need for life insurance may decrease. Let’s look at how your life insurance needs change throughout your lifetime.

Answered 3 months ago
3 months ago Naithe Aquas said:
 

FOOTLOOSE AND FANCY-FREE

As a young adult, you become more independent and self-sufficient. You no longer depend on others for your financial well-being. But in most cases, your death would still not create a financial hardship for others. For most young singles, life insurance is not a priority.

Some would argue that you should buy life insurance now, while you’re healthy and the rates are low. This may be a valid argument if you are at a high risk for developing a medical condition (such as diabetes) later in life. But you should also consider the earnings you could realize by investing the money now instead of spending it on insurance premiums.

If you have a mortgage or other loans that are jointly held with a cosigner, your death would leave the cosigner responsible for the entire debt. You might consider purchasing enough life insurance to cover these debts in the event of your death. Funeral expenses are also a concern for young singles, but it is typically not advisable to purchase a life insurance policy just for this purpose, unless paying for your funeral would burden your parents or whomever would be responsible for funeral expenses. Instead, consider investing the money you would have spent on life insurance premiums.

Your life insurance needs increase significantly if you are supporting a parent or grandparent, or if you have a child before marriage. In these situations, life insurance could provide continued support for your dependent(s) if you were to die.


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Abney Associates Ameriprise Financial Advisor: Sudden Wealth

What would you do with an extra $10,000? Maybe you’d pay off some debt, get rid of some college loans, or take a much-needed vacation. What if you suddenly had an extra million or 10 million or more? Whether you picked the right six numbers in your state’s lottery or your dear Aunt Sally left you her condo in Boca Raton, you have some issues to deal with. You’ll need to evaluate your new financial position and consider how your sudden wealth will affect your financial goals.

Answered 3 months ago

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Abney Associates Ameriprise Financial Advisor: Understanding investment terms and concepts

Below are summaries of some basic principles you should understand when evaluating an investment opportunity or making an investment decision. Rest assured, this is not rocket science. In fact, you’ll see that the most important principle on which to base your investment education is simply good common sense. You’ve decided to start investing. If you’ve had little or no experience, you’re probably apprehensive about how to begin. It’s always wise to understand what you’re investing in. The better you understand the information you receive, the more comfortable you will be with the course you’ve chosen.

Answered 3 months ago
3 months ago Jonash King said:
 

DON’T BE INTIMIDATED BY JARGON

Don’t worry if you can’t understand the experts in the financial media right away. Much of what they say is jargon that is actually less complicated than it sounds. Don’t hesitate to ask questions; when it comes to your money, the only dumb question is the one you don’t ask. Don’t wait to invest until you feel you know everything.


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